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Course Offerings Fall 2018

 

Course

Title

Cr

Time/Place

Instructor

050:101:01

Introduction to American Studies

Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, legal studies, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will examine the concept and idea of America in its global, national, community, and bodily/psychic permutations. Explores key themes from the past   such as American exceptionalism, manifest destiny, and the search for   equality and examine how these ideas have both changed and persisted as part   of a national culture and identity. Satisfies Core Goals:  AHo, AHp

3

TTh

2:15-3:35pm

RAB 206

(DC)

Decker

050:101:02

Introduction to American Studies

Introduces students to the   interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, legal   studies, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will   examine the concept and idea of America in its global, national, community, and bodily/psychic permutations. Explores key themes from the past   such as American exceptionalism, manifest destiny, and the search for   equality and examine how these ideas have both changed and persisted as part   of a national culture and identity.  Satisfies Core Goals:  AHo, AHp

3

TTh

5:00pm-6:20pm

TIL 257

(LIV)

Cevasco

050:200:01

Latinos and Community

Examines historical and contemporary formations of   Latino communities in the US. Critically analyze social, cultural, geographic, political, and symbolic developments and forces that shape Latino populations in comparative perspective. The class also interacts with members   of the local Latino community through cultural and civic events.

3

Th

5:00-7:45P

LSH A-256

(LIV)

TBD

050:201:01

The Native American Experience

An introductory survey of Native American cultures, literature, history, language, and current issues that exposes students to approaches, theories, and important concepts such as colonialism and sovereignty in Native American Studies. Through oral histories, literature, and film, students will investigate thousands of years of Native American history, but with a particular focus on current issues in Indian Country. Students will analyze representations of Indian people in American popular culture and consider major shifts in the nature of Native American sovereignty into the present. Themes of colonialism, racism, and federal Indian policy but especially Indian political activism, resistance to colonialism and racism, and cultural continuity and revitalization. Readings may include: David Treuer, Rez Life: An Indian’s Journey through Reservation Life; James Welch, Fools Crow;  Susan Power, The Grass Dancer; Peter Nabakov, Native American Testimony Eligible for CCRES minor

3

MTh

10:55-12:15pm

RAB 018

(C/D)

Sweet

050:203:01

The American West   

Examines the historical development of the US and its westward expansion and its impact on contemporary American culture. Analyzes myths, legends and the historical realities of the American West, symbols and themes, as well as Western portrayal in film and television. Satisfies Core Goals:  AHp

3

M/W

2:15-3:35P

RAB 206

(C/D)

Gillespie

050:210:

Sec 01-06 & H1

The American Dream

The American Dream takes an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture and   society. By reading widely and   examining sources as diverse as memoirs, essays, novels, images, music, and   film, this course probes the meanings and uses of the American Dream in the   life of the nation as well as in each of our own lives. The American Dream, and its meaning, continues to shift as it collides with changing social   realities as each generation projects its hopes and anxieties into its   fabric. The history of the evolving   American Dream provides the building blocks of our own dreams, aspirations, and expectations for life in the 21st Century. Satisfies Core Requirements for 21st century and AHp.

4

MTh 8:40-10:00A

TIL 254 (LIV)

Recitation Sections Vary

Masur

050:218:01

Black Visual Culture

This course focuses on visual art and culture by black artists and cultural practitioners. While focusing on the United States, we will consider the aesthetic and cultural value of blackness in a diasporic context. The class will offer an interdisciplinary framework to engage the history and art of black cultural production. Moreover, we will focus on the aesthetic, political, historiographic, and cultural instantiations of the idea of blackness as discourse in American visual culture. The class will be structured around various themes, movements, and genres that inform black visuality in the arts (e.g. film, television, literature, music, new media, photography, installation art). These topics will include the Civil Rights Era, the Black Arts and Black Power Movements, soul aesthetics, black feminist/womanist art, “the New Black Aesthetic,” independent cinema, black queer discourse, hip hop and popular culture, the racial grotesque, Afrofuturism, performance and multimedia art, and social protest art.

3

MTh

10:55-12:15P

HSB 204

(C/D)

Fleetwood

050:223:01

Learning from the Past: Early America and the 21st Century  Early Americans faced many of the same challenges as we do in the 21st century: climate change, income inequality, rapidly changing technology, and more. This course will explore how early Americans confronted the problems of their times, and what we can learn from their successes and failures. Students will produce a portfolio of opinion essays aimed at a public audience, comparing past and present. 

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: CC/HST, a, l, k

3

MTh

12:35:1:55P

RAB 105

(DC)

Cevasco

050:227:01

19th Century Am. Lit & Culture Explores 19th-century American literature and culture: the struggle for cultural authority in the early republic, the emergence of middle class domesticity and sentimentalism, the search for a distinct American literature, race and the problem of slavery, the rise of industrialism, American Romanticism, Gothic, and social realism, and the emergence of a cultural hierarchy. Literary productions from canonical novels to journalism and poetry as well as cultural texts in the form of songs, paintings, sculpture, theater, and vaudeville. Examine popular and public culture, such as engagement with sport, leisure activities, and museums. Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHp

3

MW

3:55-5:15pm

HCK 118

(C/D)

Backes

050:228:01

The Contemporary American: The Global War on Terror

The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism   (GWOT) is a term applied to an international military campaign starting after the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the US. This resulted in an international military campaign to eliminate   Al-Qaeda and other militant organizations, such as ISIS. We will focus on two   theaters of operations—Central Asia and the Middle East. By hearing from many different narrators, we will hopefully learn more about American culture in the period under discussion. We will read, watch, and listen to a variety of academic and   popular sources in order to ask broader questions about what it means to be   an American in today’s world. Eligible for CCRES Minor Satisfies   Core Curriculum Goals: AHp SCL (h,m,p)

3

MTh

10:55-12:15pm

RAB 001

(DC)

Gillespie

050:230:01

Transforming American Identities

The American body has been transformed over time physically, politically, medically, socially and culturally.  The body and its   negotiated identities are “covered,” “passed” and “performed” through the   lens of gender, sexuality, race, socioeconomic class, ability, politics and   public health.  Class discussions will be based on interdisciplinary   research, journal articles, and book chapters.  Film, social media, music, fashion, art, sport, written word, and pop culture will be sites to   critically explore spaces of the body politic.  Body fascism and   fashion; transgender bodies; bodies at war; falling bodies; smashing and   injured bodies (NASCAR and collision sports); and reassembled Cyborg bodies   (prosthetics, bioengineered, and enhancements for aging bodies) will be   interrogated in the context of “healthy” versus “Bio Others, “framed as   unhealthy bodies.  The use and impact of technology, robotics, and   fantasy will be examined from playing with Barbie dolls and action figures to   intersecting identities such as Athletics, Geeks, Marvel comics, Comic   Con, Trekkies and science fiction. Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

Th

6:10-9:00P

MU 204

(CAC)

Schuster

050:240:01

Latino Literature & Culture

Read texts by Mexican American, Chicano and Hispanic Caribbean Diasporic writers from the 1960s until 2010. Begins with the PBS documentary “Latinos in America” and Juan Flores’s work. Then focuses on close-reading of a selection of well-known texts from the Chicano tradition and of Nuyorican, Dominican American and Cuban American texts. Topics addressed: border and hybrid   identities, mestizaje, indigeneity,“la raza” and racialization, Spanglish and the limits of transculturation, the transformation of Latino gender and sexuality, and the subversion of   internal colonialism in the creation of a new notion of American identity.  We will also watch the following films: Selena (1997), Quinceañera (2006), Precious Knowledge (2012), Gun Hill Road(2013).

Crosslisted with Africana   Studies 01:595:240:01 Eligible for CCRES Minor Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo

3

MW

4:30-5:50pm

HH-B3

(CAC)

Castroman

050:245:01

Asian American Experience

Thorough a variety of genres, including history, literature, film and popular culture, interrogate the   fluid identity categories, the dynamic and diverse experiences, cultures, and   politics of “Asian American”/ “Asian Pacific American”/ “Asian Pacific   Islander American” peoples in the United States.  Cross listed   with: 01:098:262:01 Eligible for   CCRES Minor

3

MW

5:00-6:20pm

LSH A139

(LIV)

K. Ramsamy

050:246:01

Black Experience in America

Offers an inter-disciplinary examination of the Black experience in the US focusing of the themes of acculturation, alienation, oppression and   resistance. While the course surveys the Black experience from slavery to the   present, the subject matter is not approached in a simple chronological   manner. Issues and individuals discussed in the   context of the struggle of African-Americans for political rights, economic   justice and cultural accommodation. Begins with a brief look of   the position of Africa and the fledgling United States in the emerging   international economic order of the 15th and 16th centuries and how the   enslavement of Africans related to economic and political processes of this   era. Proceeds to examine the institutionalization of slavery   in the United States and the subsequent struggles for emancipation. Attempts by African-Americans to gain socio-cultural equality and political and economic rights in the aftermath of the slave experience. Cross listed with: 01: 014:203:01 Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

MW

5:00-6:20pm

BE-AUD

(LIV)

E. Ramsamy

050:259:01

Popular Culture

Explores major themes and problems in American popular culture. Analyze and discuss a wide array of movies, videos, songs, texts, and images   in an effort to understand what makes popular culture popular, how it works (or does not work) in society, what kinds of meaning it generates, and how it   is received by audiences. We will use a variety of scholarly models and   theoretical literature to help make sense of cultural productions that seem   all too familiar but bear careful scrutiny. In addition the course will take   on a special question: In what ways does popular culture shape and reflect our understandings of ourselves as human in the present age of virtuality, layered reality, mechanized intelligence, and networked identities?  Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo AHp

3

MW

3:55-5:15pm

RAB 206

(C/D)

Rockland

050:263:01

American Folklore

Folklore is the traditional, unofficial, noninstitutional form of culture. It encompasses knowledge and beliefs transmitted in traditional forms by word of mouth or by customary examples. In the first part of the course we deal with the major genres of folklore including myth, legend, folktale, ballad, and folksong. Later in the course, we briefly take up Haitian Voodoo, a syncretic religion that originated in the Caribbean country of Haiti. It is based upon the merging of the beliefs and practices of West African peoples and Roman Catholic Christianity. Still later in the course, we take up cryptozoology, the study of animals that may or may not exist. Finally, we study fairies, said to be a race of diminutive people who were driven into hiding by invading humans. They came to be seen as another race, or possibly spirits, and were believed to live in an otherworld that was variously described as existing underground, in hidden hills (many of which were ancient burial mounds), or across the Western Sea.

3

MW

3:55-5:15pm

RAB 105

(C/D)

Gillespie

050:264:01

American Folklife

In folk studies there are two terms often used—“folklore” and “folklife.” These terms are closely related, yet to scholars they have distinct meanings. What is folklore? It usually includes oral lore—such things as proverbs, riddles, myths, legends, tales, and ballads. What is folklife? It includes material folk culture—such things as folk architecture, folk crafts and art, folk costumes, and folk foods. Our focus in this course will be on American folklife. The direction in which American scholars looked for a model of folklife studies was to Europe, especially Scandinavia. In this course, we will begin with land use, cultivation, housing, settlement, and subsistence crafts, and proceed through furniture, domestic handwork, leisure-time handicrafts, decorative arts, representational art, musical instruments, and folk toys. In other words, we will be looking at the whole gamut of traditional material culture from the necessities of life to the luxuries and pleasures.

3

MTh

12:35-1:55pm

RAB 018

(C/D)

Gillespie

050:265:01

American Experimental Film & Video

Survey on the history and development of the various American experimental cinema movements from its beginnings to the present. In-depth analyses of the structure and content of films by Andy Warhol, Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, Sidney Peterson, Kenneth Anger, Bruce Baillie, Yoko Ono,and others. Emphasis on the "mise-en-scene," editing, narrative form, sound, and special effects in the films of these celebrated experimental filmmakers. Warning: some films may contain nudity, sexual situations, violence, profanity, substance abuse, and disturbing images.

3

TTh

5:35-6:55P

RAB 001

(C/D)

H

7:15-8:35P

RAB 001

(C/D)

Nigrin

050:281:01

Topics: Asian American Identities and Images LLC

Explore and learn about the diverse array of peoples of Asia decent in the Americas, including West, South, Southeast, and East Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Examine, reflect upon, and discuss representations of Asian Americans in literature, history, politics, film, scholarship, current events, and popular culture.

Living Learning Community

1.5

F

1:40-3:00pm

Asian American Cultural Center

Yoon

050:282:MA

US as Seen from Abroad I (10/25-12/10)

First of two courses that look at the US in a transnational context—that is, how it may be seen from abroad and how it may be seen in comparison with other civilizations. The focus will be on 18th and 19th century writers, both foreigners writing from abroad (some of whom never visited the United States so they write what they imagine about our country) and those who visited here. The Frenchman, Alexis de Tocqueville in his Democracy in America will figure importantly in the course; Charles Dickens in his book, American Notes, with reference as well to his only novel with a large portion taking place in the US; Martin Chuzzlewit; Mark Twain in his hilarious travelogue, The Innocents Abroad; and Henry James in his novel taking place in Paris, The American. A film or two will also be seen outside of class. It may be worth mentioning that Professor Rockland began his career in the US Diplomatic Service and that three of his books concern America on the international scene.

1.5

MTh

12:35-1:55p

CDL 110

(C/D)

Rockland

050:283:MA

Topics: Contemporary Arts Adventure (10/28-12/9)

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off‐Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience the arts of our time. We will examine the way current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

1.5

Sun                   

11:30-2:30p

SC 201

(CAC)

Appels

050:283:MB

Topics: Contemporary Arts Adventure (10/28-12/9)

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off‐Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience the arts of our time. We will examine the way current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

1.5

Sun

8:20-11:20a

SC 201

(CAC)

Appels

050:284:MB

US as Seen from Abroad II (10/25-12/10)

Like “The United States as Seen From Abroad I,” the course understands our country by comparing it with other countries. This second course looks at 20th century writers and their works, including Graham Greene’s, The Quiet American and David Lodge’s hilarious Changing Places, in which a British professor and an American one exchange positions and countries for a year. We will also see a film or two outside of class. Finally, a portion of the course will be devoted to American Foreign Policy and, as well, our tendency to think of our country in exceptionalist terms. Professor Rockland began his career in the United States Diplomatic Service and that three of his books are concerned with the United States from an international perspective.

1.5

MTh

9:15-10:35a

RAB 208

Rockland

050:301:02

Topics: Director Spike Lee

This   course will survey the work of Spike Lee through screenings, lectures and   group discussions. Students will expand their understanding of the narrative   film genre as well as that of storytelling. Most importantly, this course   will examine the use of film as a medium and conduit for change, conversation   and understanding. Spike Lee's films, both narrative and non-narrative will   be compared and contrasted for their similarities and differences.

Cross listed with: 01:014:301:02

3

W

5:00-8:00p

TIL 251

(LIV)

Grier

050:303:01

Decades: 1990s

This course is a study of the history, literature, and popular culture a single decade in American life: the 1990s. Topics include the presidency of George HW Bush, Bill Clinton, the middle east, urban decline and renewal, deindustrialization, LGBTQ rights, the second generation of the AIDS crisis, the war on drugs, evangelical Christianity, the Wall Street boom, a changing workforce, RAP music, "white trash" culture, cyberpunks, and the new American family.  Public figures explored include Spike Lee, Bikini Kill, Nirvana, Vanilla Ice, David Lynch, Mike Meyers, Rose Troche, Kevin Smith, OJ Simpson, the Cohen Brothers, Hillary Clinton, Quentin Tarantino, N.W.A. and Donald Trump.  Course materials will be drawn from history, sociology, law, fiction, poetry, essays, TV and films.  By the end of the course, students will have developed a basic knowledge of the public events, artistic achievements, and cultural life of the Americas in the 1990s.

3

MW

5:35-6:55p

RAB 208

(C/D)

Backes

050:313:01

America as a Business Culture

This course will examine the social, cultural and political underpinnings   of economic constructs such as money, the market, and consumption. Some of the   issues that will be explored are debt in America, as illustrated by the high amounts   of credit card debt many Americans have and the increasing numbers of Americans   declaring bankruptcy. We will also delve into the political economy of higher   education, identifying the factors that contribute to the continuing rise of tuitions, why colleges and universities engage in what is referred to as an “arms race,”   and what is meant by the commodification of education. We will also analyze the   culture of Wall Street, and the changing landscape of retirement in America. Cross listed with:   01:014:301:07

 

3

MTh

9:15-10:35a

HCK 205

(C/D)

Prisock

050:316:01

21st Century Writing

This course will explore new genres of writing and some popular updates of familiar genres, such as the memoir, the novel, and the short story. In particular, we will examine blogs, read a graphic novel, examine some outsider perspectives on 9-11 and subsequent events, and finish the semester with a unit on zombies in popular literature and film. There will be individual reports on YouTube videos and group discussions.  Satisfies Core Curriculum  Goal: CC/AHp

3

MW

2:15-3:35p

HSB 204

Moomjy

050:321:01

American Conservatism

This class will explore the conservative tradition in U.S. politics and culture, from the American Revolution to the present day. We will investigate the major impulses and ideas associated with the political right and discuss how conservatism has been manifested in American politics, government, literature, and culture. Specific topics to be considered include: the contested meanings of the American founding, the ideology of the antebellum South, religion in American culture, free markets and anti-communism, and the New Right as a political movement. We will study partisans of the right but also complicated and ambiguous figures—individuals who cannot be claimed exclusively by any one particular “side.” Readings include historical accounts, political writings, social commentary, and fiction.

3

TTh

3:55-5:15p

FNH 101

(C/D)

Decker

050:324:01

Wayward Americans

Explore various groups of “wayward” Americans.  Or, to put it another way, we will examine our understandings of what it means to be “normal,” with particular focus on physical, mental, and behavioral norms.  Some questions we will consider are: “How do we determine who or what is normal?  Has the definition of normal remained consistent over time and place?  How is normalcy measured?  And by whom?  How important is context – geographic location, social and cultural background, age, gender, race, ethnicity, and religion – when determining normalcy?  By examining various groups that have been described as: different; weird; deviant; abnormal; beyond the pale; on the fringe – including the “feeble-minded,” religious fanatics, criminals, and “sexual deviants” – we will seek to understand the historical, sociological, and psychological frameworks that have rendered these groups outside of mainstream American society.

3

M

7:15-10:05p

HSB 206

(C/D)

Zemla

050:344:01

Islam in/and America

Examines the history and presence of Islam in the United States, and the   construction and evolution of U.S. Muslim identity, community, and culture. In our contemporary moment, “Islam” is perhaps   the most misunderstood term in the national lexicon, and stands at the heart of   numerous cultural and political debates about “who we are” as a nation. Islam’s presence in the   Americas stretches back four centuries, to when over one third of African slaves   forcibly transported here were Muslim. At the start of the 20th century, the religion   forcefully re-emerged amongst Black American communities in urban centers in the   North such as Chicago and Detroit. Examines the diverse historical presence of Muslims in the   United States, alongside representations and stereotypes of Islam and Muslims in media and popular culture. Representations of Black American Muslims and   U.S. Muslim women.  Eligible for  CCRES Minor

3

T 2:15-3:35p

HCK 205

Th 2:15-3:35p

HCK 119

(C/D)

Chan-Malik

050:355:01

Museums, Monuments, and American Culture

This course examines the role that museums and monuments, as well as historic sites, tours, and other public forms of commemoration, have in American culture. It will focus on how acts of memorialization produce public and collective memories, and the politics that surround how the past is remembered. At a moment when Americans debate whether monuments to slaveowners and Confederate generals should remain standing, how public institutions can be made more inclusive to different groups and histories, and what roles museums should have in the twenty first century, so too will the course wrestle with these pressing contemporary concerns. In addition, we will also explore the complicated dynamics between education and entertainment; celebration and criticism; and vernacular and official forms of commemoration.

This class will include two optional (but exciting!) field trips. In October, this class will join other American Studies students on a two-day, overnight trip to Washington, DC. The other will be a day trip to either New York or Philadelphia.

3

2:15-3:35P

RAB 206

(C/D)

Urban

050:389:01

Junior Seminar: Digital Humanities

This course will explore the emergent field of the digital humanities, and how identities, ideas, and communication are mediated through digital technologies and mediums. Topics considered may include the meaning of community and civil society in a virtual or cyber age; how digital technologies contribute to the production and reproduction of information; the research uses of digital archives, databases, and cyber ethnography; and, the tension between human existence as a physical, embodied set of practices, and human existence as a set of digital connections and experiences.    

Satisfies Core Goals: WcD, WcR (t, u, v)

3

W

3:55-6:55p

RAB 018

(C/D)

Urban

050:389:02

Junior Seminar: Prisons in American Culture

This course will explore the emergent field of the digital humanities, and how identities, ideas, social behavior, and communication get mediated through digital technologies and mediums. Topics considered may include the meaning of community and civil society in a virtual or cyber age; how digital technologies contribute to the production and reproduction of information; how virtual and digital realities get explored in works of fiction; the research uses of digital archives, databases, and cyber ethnography; and, the tension between human existence as a physical, embodied set of practices, and human existence as a set of digital connections and experiences. Satisfies Core Goals: WcD, WcR (t, u, v)

3

Th

2:15-5:15p

HCK 132

(C/D)

Fleetwood

050:491:U1

Independent Study/Project in American Culture

BA

BA

Urban

050:495:01

Honors in American Studies

BA

BA

Masur

 


Satellite Campuses:

050:300:A1

Comedy and Culture

3

Th

3:00-4:20p

Atlantic Cape

McElhinney

050:302:WM

Fantasy, Animation and Sci-Fi

3

M

6:00-7:20pm

Western Monmouth

McElhinney

050:303:A1

Decades: 1970’s

3

Th

4:20-5:40pm

Atlantic Cape

McElhinney

050:303:F1

Decades: 1990’s

3

T

6:00-8:40pm

Middlesex CC

Backes

050:303:WM

Decades: 1990’s

3

M

7:20-8:40pm

Western Monmouth

McElhinney

050:307:A1

Decades: 1960’s

3

W

12:00-2:40pm

Atlantic Cape

DeConcini

050:314:R1

Tech and Culture

3

Th

6:00-8:40p

Raritan Valley CC

Moomjy

050:317:A1

Law & American Culture

3

T

3:00-5:40p

Atlantic Cape

Furman

 

 

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RAB 201 & RAB 211
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08901-1414

tel. 848-932-9174