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Course Offerings Spring 2015

Spring 2015 New Brunswick

 

Course

Title

Cr

Time/Place

Instructor

101:01

Intro to American Studies

Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, essays, law, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will examine the concept of “America” as a global, national, community, and an individual concept.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: o, p

3

M/W

5:35PM-6:55PM

RAB 001

C/D

Ferguson

101:02

Intro to American Studies

Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, essays, law, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will examine the concept of “America” as a global, national, community, and an individual concept.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: o, p

3

T/TH

4:30PM-5:50PM

FH B5

CAC

Sifuentes

102:01

Race and Ethnicity in America

Examine the logics of race and racism within political, legal, and cultural contexts both in and beyond the United States.  Students will gain a critical vocabulary to discuss race and racism, and asks what it means to be "antiracist" in our contemporary moment. 

Eligible for CCRES minor

3

T/TH

2:15PM-3:35PM

RAB 207

C/D

Chan-Malik

200:01

Transforming American Bodies and Identities

The American body has been transformed over time physically, socially, culturally, and politically.  Examine negotiated identities, “covering and passing” bodies through the lens of gender, sexuality, race, socioeconomic class, ability, and more.   Social media, film, art, marvel comics, action figures, fashion, and pop culture will be considered to examine sites and spaces of the surgically embellished, ambiguous, surveilled, bold, queer, trans, roided, androgynous, oppressed, and subverted American body in all of its transformations and wonder.

Eligible for CCRES minor

3

TH

6:10PM-9:10PM

SC 101

CAC

Schuster

215:01

Springsteen’s American Vision

Examines the musical and cultural meaning and significance of Bruce Springsteen, an American icon whose work spans five decades. We will probe the roots of his rock ‘n’ roll vision, the transformation of his work over time, and the broader themes that he has addressed as he morphed from a young punk on the streets to a rocker facing the darkness of fame to a misunderstood symbol of America gone awry to an activist who in late middle age sought to make America live up to its promises. Explore themes of escape, work, faith, community, and justice.

3

T

10:20AM-1:20PM

TIL 258

LIV

Masur

225:01

Thought and Society in the American Past

Examines central American cultural constructions of the long nineteenth century from the Revolutionary era to the eve of WWI: republicanism, revivalism, transcendentalism, populism, progressivism, and pragmatism, among others. Analyzes a variety of historical, visual, literary and performance texts from the era.

3

T/TH

6:10PM-7:30PM

FH B1

CAC

Urban

240:01

Latino Literature and Culture

Study of recent texts produced by and about Latino/as in the U.S. Examination of issues of exile, integration and assimilation, political presence and nationalism.

3

T/TH

1:10PM-2:30PM

HH-A3

CAC

Martinez-San Miguel

246:01

Black Experience in America

3

MW

5:00PM-6:20PM

LSH A143

LIV

Ramsamy

250:01

Cultures of Portuguese Speaking Communities

Explore issues concerning the socio-culture of the Portuguese-Speaking Communities in the US, mainly the Portuguese, Brazilians, and Cape Verdeans. We will look at household structure, ethnic identity, education, employment, music, church and religion as well as assimilation/acculturation.

If full, register with cross-list: 01:810:250:01

3

M

5:35PM-8:35PM

HCK 113

C/D

Serra

267:01

American Film Directors

Focus on the films of American Film Directors Stanley Kubrick, Orson Welles, John Frankenheimer, Bruce Conner, Andy Warhol, Val Lewton, and others. In-depth analyses of film structure and content, including: 2001: A Space Odyssey, Seconds, Chelsea Girls, Cat People, The Magnificent Ambersons, and others.

If full register with cross-list: 01:175:267:01

3

T

5:35PM-6:55PM

TH

5:35PM-8:35PM

RAB 001

C/D

Nigrin

281:01

Asian American Studies Learning Community

Provides a unique opportunity for students to learn about the role of West, South, Southeast, and East Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the sociopolitical landscape of the United States and the Americas. (Cr/No Cr)

Contact rick.lee@rutgers.edu for application.

1.5

F

1:40PM-3:00PM

AACC

LIV

Lee

282:01

Architecture on Queen’s Campus

Introduces students to an aspect of architectural history little considered, the changing social, economic and political climates that create the character and memory of spaces. Every architectural element has a story, and that story revolves around the culture in which and by whom it is built.

Begins Mar 10 (7weeks)

1.5

T/F

12:35PM-1:55PM

RAB 206

C/D

Reeves

282:02

Architecture on Queen’s Campus

Introduces students to an aspect of architectural history little considered, the changing social, economic and political climates that create the character and memory of spaces. Every architectural element has a story, and that story revolves around the culture in which and by whom it is built.

Begins Mar 9 (7 weeks)

1.5

M/W

7:15PM-8:35PM

ARH 100

C/D

Reeves

283:01

Arts Adventure - Syllabus

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off-Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience differing artistic forms. How do the aesthetic values of one art discipline (for example, painting) influence the creation of works in another artistic field (such as music or theatre)? We will examine how current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Begins March 8 (7 weeks)

1.5

SU

8:30AM-11:15AM

SC 221

CAC

Appels

283:02

Arts Adventure - Syllabus

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off-Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience differing artistic forms. How do the aesthetic values of one art discipline (for example, painting) influence the creation of works in another artistic field (such as music or theatre)? We will examine how current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Begins March 8 (7 weeks)

1.5

SU

11:30AM-2:15PM

SC 221

CAC

Appels

284:01

New York Underground Music: 1973-1983

Examines New York City underground music and culture between 1973 and 1983.  We will use glam rock, punk, disco, No Wave, punk funk, mutant disco, and hip hop musics to chart developments in attitudes concerning politics, race, gender, and sexuality.  A larger project of the class will be investigating how the music produced in and around Manhattan during this period came to influence mainstream popular music in the 1980s to the present day.  

Begins March 12 (7 weeks)

1.5

Th

6:10PM-9:00PM

RAB 207

C/D

Rzigalinski

284:04

American Studies Media Culture Project

By engaging several digital platforms, students investigate how cultural dependency on technology shapes personal identities and the relationships they form with their surrounding communities in the 21st century.

1.5

By Arrangement

Rzigalinski

291:01

Jerseyana: Culture of New Jersey

Investigates the history, culture, and politics of New Jersey, at the 350th anniversary of the state, and the origins of the Jersey joke and how, with the coming of Bruce Springsteen and the Sopranos, the joke became irrelevant and it is now cool to be from Jersey.

3

T/TH

3:55PM-5:15PM

HCK 216

C/D

Rockland

300:01

Hemingway and His Influence

Ernest Hemingway was the most influential twentieth‐century writer. His style and values had a powerful effect on most American male writers of succeeding generations and on writers in other languages as well. In this seminar we will read the best of Hemingway and some writers who have carried his legacy into later periods.

If full, register with cross-list: 01:358:363:01

3

T

5:35PM-8:35PM

RAB 018

C/D

Barnett

301:01

Public History: Theory, Method and Practice

Interpretations of the past are produced by diverse individuals in a variety of different public settings, forms, and venues, and in an ever-growing range of digital mediums. This course provides an introduction to the theory, methods, practice, and politics of “public history”-- producing histories in nonacademic settings—through readings, workshops conducted by professionals in the field, and site visits.

If full, register with cross-list: 01:506:301:01

3

M

3:55PM-6:55PM

ARH 100

C/D

Urban

302:01

Latinos and Race

Various ways in which race is constituted and how dominant racial identities create a framework for Latino identity in the United States. How notions of white people, white culture, and whiteness are understood by populations racialized as the Other, particularly Latinos. If full, register with 01:595:301
Not open to first-year students.

3

W

5:00PM - 7:40 PM

LSH- A256

LIV

Banales

310:01

Approaches: Performance Studies

Performance studies is an interdisciplinary field that borrows from theatre studies, anthropology, sociology, art history, and cultural studies. Examine a broad range of performances on and off the stage, live and recorded, including performance art, storytelling, celebrations, political speeches, concerts, protests, street happenings, and everyday encounters. The course emphasizes the relationship between theory and practice. Therefore, students will be required to “get their hands dirty.”

3

T

10:55AM-1:55PM

RAB 018

C/D

Fleetwood

312:01

Sports in American Culture

Examines the place of sports in American life. We will consider the nature of the American sports "hero," sports as a multi-billion dollar industry, and sports as a metaphor for American ideas and values.  Guests from the world of sports will be invited.

3

T/TH

2:15PM-3:35PM

HCK 216

C/D

Rockland

316:01

21st Century Expression

Examine 21st century updates of some familiar genres, such as the memoir, the novel, and the short story. We will read a graphic novel, consider some outsider perspectives on 9-11 and subsequent events, and finish the semester with a unit on zombies in popular literature and film. Individual reports on YouTube videos and group discussions.

3

T/TH

2:15PM-3:35PM

HCK 113

C/D

Barnett

325:01

Women on the Fringe

Examines societal responses to female behavior deviating from prescribed norms of social and feminine behavior from the colonial period to the present through the use of historical narratives, literature, and film to treat such themes as heresy, madness, prostitution, adultery, criminality, drug addiction, political protest, and lesbianism.

If full, register with cross-list: 01:988:325:01

3

M/TH

9:50AM-11:10AM

FH B2

CAC

Fishbein

339:01

Race, Culture, and Politics: Blacks and Jews in America

Exploration of the complexities of how black and Jewish religious, political, and cultural identities have evolved in relationship to one another via an examination of social and political history, literature, and film. This course is cross-listed with Jewish Studies 01:563:359:01 and Africana Studies 01:014:359:01: Blacks and Jews in American History.

If full, register with cross-list: 512:359 or 563:359

Eligible for CCRES minor

3

T

2:15PM-5:15PM

RAB 018

Fishbein

377:01

Asian American Literature

Introduce students to a selection of literature and film by and about people of Asian descent in the United States. Through various literary genres—autobiography, fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, and graphic narrative—we will examine a set of interrelated topics, including: history and memory; migration and displacement; sexuality and desire; generation and kinship; and forms of belonging and non-belonging.

Cross-Listed: 358:389

Eligible for CCRES minor

3

M/W

6:10PM-7:30PM

FH B5

CAC

Lee

450:01

Folk Festival Management

Focus on the theoretical study of folk cultures while developing skills in planning, fieldwork, administration, funding, staffing, publicity, and production of the New Jersey Folk Festival at Rutgers.

3

M

6:00PM-9:00PM

RAB 018

C/D

Gillespie

489:01

Seminar: American Images

Examine the place of images-- paintings, cartoons, and photographs-- in American society. The emphasis will be on learning how to read and analyze images and understanding the work they do in the culture at large. Paintings of westward expansion, photographs of the depression, and images of 9/11 are among the topics to be covered.

3

M

10:55AM-1:55PM

RAB 018

C/D

Masur

496:01

Honors Thesis in American Studies

3

By Arrangement

Faculty

Rutgers Satellite Campuses

Course

Title

Cr

Time/Place

Instructor

300:80

The Changing American Family

Examines the evolution of American families from colonial times to the present. We will consider the impact of religion, region, race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexual orientation on family formation and culture and will explore such issues as representation, memory, and the ideology of family life.

3

W

6:00PM-8:40PM

ACCC

Atlantic City/Mays Landing

Furman

301:80

Religion in America

Explores religion as a central component of American culture from the period of the American Revolution to the present. Thematically the class centers on the relationship between religion and identities—national, regional, ethnic, class-based—and on the role of religion in the production and reception of secular cultural forms.

3

W

6:00PM-8:40PM

RVCC

Backes

301:83

You are What You Eat: Culture and Food in America

A cross-disciplinary look at the many cultures of food in the United States with an emphasis on the transition to industrial agriculture following World War II.  The course examines personal food choices and sociocultural dietary norms.

3

TH

6:00PM-9:00PM

WM

Appels

303:80

Decade in American Culture: “The Good Old Days”

Focuses on the 1950s in America, with an emphasis on the legal and cultural events of a decade seen by some as “happy days” and a golden age and by others as a dark night of repression and uniformity. Issues including loyalty oaths, naming names and the blacklist (McCarthyism), Brown v. Board of Education and the early civil rights movement, the birth of rock and roll and the radio payola scandal, obscenity law and censorship from comic books and Allen Ginsberg to Lenny Bruce, alienated teenagers and juvenile delinquency and the postwar sex crime panic.

3

W

3:00PM-5:40PM

ACCC

Atlantic City/Mays Landing

Furman

304:80

The American City

An interdisciplinary approach to the history, culture, problems and future of the American urban environment by investigating specific icons of American urbanism, including the World's Fair of 1893, Rockefeller Center, Levittown, Los Angeles, and Atlantic City. The course will also trace the progression of urbanism in America by examining how urban areas are portrayed in literature, music, art, film and popular culture.

3

M

12:00PM-2:40PM

AACC

McElhinney

305:80

Image and Narrative of War

Conflict and war are the irrepressible outcome of society and its politics. For the past one hundred years, media has represented warfare in the service of documentation, propaganda as well as pacifism. Meanwhile technology—developed because of modern warfare—has resulted in increasingly portable imaging capabilities. This innovation parallels the trajectory of handheld footage from combat zones irreversibly influencing the way fictitious action is currently captured.

3

M

3:00PM-5:40PM

RVCC

Chadwick

324:80

Wayward Americans

Examines the expectations that Americans have placed on political, social, cultural, and economic behavior, and how the violation of established norms in these different arenas has led to ostracization, conflict, and repression. We will explore “wayward” actions committed by Americans as both the consequence of different forms of exclusion, and as conscious resistance against the dominant order. Analyze how outsider statuses have informed the construction of racial, sexual, class, and gendered identities.

3

M
3:00PM-5:40PM

ACCC

McElhinney

342:80

American Sexuality: Sex, Love, Romance, Dating

An overview of the psychological and humanist literature on modern conceptions of love, courtship, and sexual behavior.  How does one navigate romance in the midst of gender identity politics, sexual identity, and mediated sexuality?

3

TH

3:00PM-6:00PM

WM

Appels

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Ruth Adams Building
131 George Street
RAB 024 & RAB 103
New Brunswick, NJ
08901-1414

tel. 848-932-9174