SAS Banner
SAS Mobile Banner
-
-

Course Offerings Fall 2016

Master Undergraduate Catalog

This is a listing of our course offerings for the current semester. Click the plus sign (+) to display full information about the course. 

Course descriptions appear below the course list.

CourseCrCourse TitleCross Listing
listingcreditstitlecrossSectionsPrint

Course

Title

Cr

Time/Place

Instructor

101:01

Intro to American Studies: “America” as Idea

Introduces students to the   interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, legal   studies, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will   examine the concept and idea of America in its global, national, community,   and bodily/psychic permutations. We will explores key themes from the past   such as American exceptionalism, manifest destiny, and the search for   equality and examine how these ideas have both changed and persisted as part   of a national culture and identity. The goal of the course is to expose   students to intellectual and creative possibilities in the field of American   Studies, as well as to provide incoming majors with key concepts and   analytical tools that can be used in more advanced courses. Emphasis will be   placed on students’ analytical skills, close reading, verbal articulations of   interdisciplinary scholarship, and critical thinking.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo   AHp

3

T/Th

2:15-3:35

RAB 206

(D/C)

Decker

101:02

Intro to American Studies: “America” as Idea

Introduces students to the   interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, legal   studies, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class   will examine the concept and idea of America in its global, national,   community, and bodily/psychic permutations. We will explores key themes from   the past such as American exceptionalism, manifest destiny, and the search   for equality and examine how these   ideas have both changed and persisted as part of a national culture and   identity. The goal of the course is to expose students to intellectual and   creative possibilities in the field of American Studies, as well as to   provide incoming majors with key concepts and analytical tools that can be   used in more advanced courses. Emphasis will be placed on students’   analytical skills, close reading, verbal articulations of interdisciplinary   scholarship, and critical thinking.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo   AHp

 

3

T/Th

5:00-6:20

TIL 257

(LIV)

Isaac

200:01

TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES: Latinos   and Community

This   interdisciplinary course examines historical and contemporary formations of   Latino communities in the US. We critically analyze social, cultural,   geographic, political, and symbolic developments and forces that shape Latino   populations in comparative perspective. The class also interacts with members   of the local Latino community through cultural and civic events.

Cross listed with 01:590:299:01 and   01:595:299:01

3

W

5:00-7:45

LSH   A256

LIV

 

201:01

TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES: Politicizing   Beyoncé

Politicizing Beyoncé is both a   survey of black feminist activist writing AND an in-depth analysis of the   work of Beyoncé Gisele Knowles-Carter to answer the following questions: How   does a history of black feminism echo throughout Beyoncé songs and videos?   How does Beyoncé expand the boundaries of our normative understanding of   race, gender, and sexuality in the U.S. to make room for perhaps more “deviant” bodies,   desires, and politics? What can Beyoncé’s career and popularity teach   us about the American experience? And finally, can Beyoncé’s music be   seen as a blueprint for progressive social change? Readings are not about   Beyoncé. Readings focus on social issues and politics throughout American   history, and are all written by black women themselves. The work of “Politicizing   Beyoncé,” which is   heavily discussion-based, is putting this intellectual and activist history   in conversation with Beyoncé’s music, lyrics, and videos.

 

3

M/W

2:15-3:35

RAB 206

(C/D)

Allred

210:H1/01-06

The American Dream

The American Dream takes   an interdisciplinary approach to the study of American culture and   society. By reading widely and   examining sources as diverse as memoirs, essays, novels, images, music, and   film, this course probes the meanings and uses of the American Dream in the   life of the nation as well as in each of our own lives. The American Dream,   and its meaning, continues to shift as it collides with changing social   realities as each generation projects its hopes and anxieties into its   fabric. The history of the evolving   American Dream provides the building blocks of our own dreams, aspirations,   and expectations for life in the 21st Century.

Satisfies Core Requirements for 21st century and Ahp.

4

M/Th

8:40-10:00

TIL   254

(LIV)
  Th* *Recitation

See   Online Schedule of Classes for recitation times and locations

Masur

227:01

19th   Century American Literature and Culture

This class explores 19th-century American literature within a broad   social and cultural context. Topics covered include the struggle for cultural   authority in the early republic, the emergence of middle class culture and   sentimentalism, the search for a distinct American literature, race and the   problem of slavery, Romanticism and realism, and the emergence of cultural   hierarchy. We will look at a wide range of literary productions from   canonical novels to popular newspaper columns. Readings may include works by   Charles Brockden Brown, Herman Melville, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman,   Mark Twain, Florence Perkins Gilman, and Charles Chesnutt.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHp

3

M/Th

10:55-12:15

RAB   018

(D/C)

Backes

228:01

Contemporary   American: The Global War on Terrorism

The War on Terror, also known as the Global War on Terrorism   (GWOT) is a term which has been applied to an international military campaign   that started after the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks on the United   States. This resulted in an international military campaign to eliminate   AL-Qaeda and other militant organizations, such as ISIS. We will focus on two   theaters of operations—Central Asia and the Middle East. By hearing from many different narrators,   we will hopefully learn more about American culture in the period under   discussion. We will read, watch, and listen to a variety of academic and   popular sources in order to ask broader questions about what it means to be   an American in today’s world.

Satisfies   Core Curriculum Goals: AHp SCL (h,m,p)

Eligible for CCRES Minor

 

3

M/Th

10:55-12:15

RAB   001

(C/D)

Gillespie  

230:01

Fashioning   Bodies and Identities in American Culture

The American body has been transformed over time physically,   politically, medically, socially and culturally.  The body and its   negotiated identities are “covered,” “passed” and “performed” through the   lens of gender, sexuality, race, socioeconomic class, ability, politics and   public health.  Class discussions will be based on interdisciplinary   research, journal articles, and book chapters.  Film, social media,   music, fashion, art, sport, written word, and pop culture will be sites to   critically explore spaces of the body politic.  Body fascism and   fashion; transgender bodies; bodies at war; falling bodies; smashing and   injured bodies (NASCAR and collision sports); and reassembled Cyborg bodies   (prosthetics, bioengineered, and enhancements for aging bodies) will be   interrogated in the context of “healthy” versus “Bio Others, “framed as   unhealthy bodies.  The use and impact of technology, robotics, and   fantasy will be examined from playing with Barbie dolls and action figures to   intersecting identities such as Athletics, Geeks, Marvel comics, Comic   Con, Trekkies and science fiction.

Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

Th

6:10-9:00

SC   220

(CAC)

Schuster

240:01

Latino   Literature and Culture

This course proposes a   definition of Latino literature and culture by reviewing some of the   canonical texts produced by Mexican American, Chicano and Hispanic Caribbean   Diasporic writers from the 1960s until 2010. The course begins with a working   definition of Latino Studies, using the PBS documentary Latinos in America   and Juan Flores’s work. Then we will   focus on the close-reading of a selection of well-known texts from the Chicano   tradition (Tomás Rivera, Sandra Cisneros, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Richard   Rodríguez), and a selection of Nuyorican, Dominican American and Cuban   American texts (Piri Thomas, Pedro Pietri, Tato Laviera, Lourdes Casal,   Gustavo Pérez Firmat, Cristina García, Junot Díaz, Julia Alvarez and Sonia   Rivera Valdés). Some of the topics   addressed in class will be: conceptualizations of the border and hybrid   identities, mestizaje, indigeneity,   “la raza” and racialization, Spanglish and the limits of transculturation,   the transformation of Latino gender and sexuality, and the subversion of   internal colonialism in the creation of a new notion of American identity.   Another main line of reflection in the class is what is the role of   literature—including oral, written and visual narratives— and what is the   relationship between genre in the articulation of a U.S. Latino ethnic   identity.   We will also watch the   following films: Selena (1997), Quinceañera (2006), Prescious Knowledge (2012), Gun   Hill Road (2013).  

Crosslisted with Africana   Studies 01:595:240:01

Eligible for CCRES Minor

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo

3

M/W

1:40-3:00

LSH-A256

(LIV)

Martinez-San   Miguel

245:01

Asian   American Experience

Thorough a variety of genres,   including history, literature, film and popular culture, interrogate the   fluid identity categories, the dynamic and diverse experiences, cultures, and   politics of “Asian American”/ “Asian Pacific American”/ “Asian Pacific   Islander American” peoples in the United States. 

Eligible for   CCRES Minor

Cross listed   with: 01:098:262:01

3

MW

1:10-2:30

SC   205

(CAC)

Ramsamy, K.

246:01

Black   Experience in America

The course offers an   inter-disciplinary examination of the Black experience in the United States   focusing of the themes of acculturation, alienation, oppression and   resistance. While the course surveys the Black experience from slavery to the   present, the subject matter is not approached in a simple chronological   manner. The various issues and individuals discussed are situated in the   context of the struggle of African-Americans for political rights, economic   justice and cultural accommodation. The course begins with a brief look of   the position of Africa and the fledgling United States in the emerging   international economic order of the 15th and 16th centuries and how the   enslavement of Africans related to economic and political processes of this   era. The course then proceeds to examine the institutionalization of slavery   in the United States and the subsequent struggles for emancipation. The   attempts by African-Americans to gain socio-cultural equality and political   and economic rights in the aftermath of the slave experience make-up the   remainder of the course.

Cross listed with: 01: 014:203:01

Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

M/W

5:00-6:20

BE-AUD  

(LIV)

Ramsamy,   E.

259:01

Popular Culture

This   class explores major themes and problems in American popular culture. We will   analyze and discuss a wide array of movies, videos, songs, texts, and images   in an effort to understand what makes popular culture popular, how it works   (or does not work) in society, what kinds of meaning it generates, and how it   is received by audiences. We will use a variety of scholarly models and   theoretical literature to help make sense of cultural productions that seem   all too familiar but bear careful scrutiny. In addition the course will take   on a special question: In what ways does popular culture shape and reflect   our understandings of ourselves as human in the present age of virtuality,   layered reality, mechanized intelligence, and networked identities? 

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo AHp

3

T/Th

3:55-5:15

HCK   132

(D/C)

Backes

263:01

American Folklore: Weird Tales

Folklore   is the traditional, unofficial, non-institutional form of culture. It   encompasses knowledge and beliefs transmitted in traditional forms by word of   mouth or by customary examples. In the first part of the course we deal with   the major genres of folklore including myth, legend, folktale, ballad, and   folksong. Later in the course, we briefly take up Haitian Voodoo and monsters   that may or may not exist, as well as folk art, calendar customs, and   foodways.

3

M/W

5:35-6:55

RAB   208

(C/D)

Gillespie  

265:01

American Experimental Film

A   survey course focusing on the history and development of the various American   experimental cinema movements from its beginnings to the present. In-depth   analyses of the structure and content of films by Andy Warhol, Maya Deren,   Stan Brakhage, Sidney Peterson, Kenneth Anger, Bruce Baillie, Yoko Ono,and others. Emphasis on the   "mise-en-scene," editing, narrative form, sound, and special   effects in the films of these celebrated experimental filmmakers. Warning:   some films may contain nudity, sexual situations, violence, profanity,   substance abuse, and disturbing images.

Cross listed with: 01:175:265:01

3

T/Th

5:35-6:55

Th

7:15-8:35

RAB   001

(C/D)

Nigrin

281:01

TOPICS: Asian American Studies Learning Community

Explore   and learn about the diverse array of peoples of Asian descent in the   Americas, including West, South, Southeast, and East Asian Americans and   Pacific Islanders. Throughout the semester, we will examine, reflect upon,   and discuss representations of Asian Americans in literature, history,   politics, film, scholarship, current events, and popular culture.

1.5

F

1:40-3:00

Asian American Cultural

Center

(LIV)

Hwang

282:01

 

American Sexualities

An historical survey of American sexualities and sexual cultures from the colonial era through the present, this course will focus on primary source documents and on classic texts that have helped to shape the emerging field of sexuality studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which politics, race, religion, ethnicity, age, region, and gender have influenced American sexual cultures and the efforts to regulate them. The course will employ an interdisciplinary approach to its subject, examining artifacts from visual culture such as cartoons, photographs, paintings, and film as well as printed sources. Special Note: Please contact the Registrar's Office at 848-445-2757 to register for mini courses.  BEGINS 10/24/16. ENDS 12/12/16

 

M/Th

9:15-10:35

RAB 018

(C/D)

 

282:02

American Sexualities

An historical survey of American sexualities and sexual cultures from the colonial era through the present, this course will focus on primary source documents and on classic texts that have helped to shape the emerging field of sexuality studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which politics, race, religion, ethnicity, age, region, and gender have influenced American sexual cultures and the efforts to regulate them. The course will employ an interdisciplinary approach to its subject, examining artifacts from visual culture such as cartoons, photographs, paintings, and film as well as printed sources. Special Note: Please contact the Registrar's Office at 848-445-2757 to register for mini courses.   BEGINS 10/24/16. ENDS 12/12/16

 

M/Th

12:35-1:55

RAB 018

(C/D)

 

283:01

TOPICS   IN AMERICAN STUDIES: Contemporary Arts Adventure

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off‐Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience the arts of our time. We will examine the way current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Course   runs Sunday 10/23-Sunday 12/4

 

1.5

Sun

11:30-2:30

SC 201

(CAC)

Begins   10/23/16

Appels

283:02

TOPICS   IN AMERICAN STUDIES: Contemporary Arts Adventure

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off‐Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience the arts of our time. We will examine the way current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Course   runs Sunday 10/23-Sunday 12/4

 

1.5

Sun

8:20-11:20

SC   201

(CAC)

Begins   10/23/16

Appels  

284:01

New Brunswick Architecture

Explores the interrelations between New Brunswick's architecture and its social history. The emphasis is less on stylistic differences than it is on how buildings and urban spaces -- commercial, residential, educational and ecclesiastical -- have functioned and altered over the course of New Brunswick's history, to suit changing cultural, technological, political and economic needs. Topics will be explored through class meetings, field trips and written assignments. Be prepared to walk outside.

Course runs 10/24 to 12/12  

 

M

9:15-12:15

RAB 018

C/D

Begins 10/24

 Murtha

291:01

Jerseyana
 
This course assumes that there is such a thing as New Jersey   culture and that it differs from that of other American states in its ideas,   values, and assumptions—its way of thinking of itself and, as well, what   others think of us. Why is New Jersey put down so readily by Saturday Night   Live and most Woody Allen movies—with the famous or infamous Jersey joke? Is   it possible they are jealous of us when you consider that New Jersey has been   a veritable engine of invention and talent? Is it accidental, for example,   that Frank Sinatra and perhaps the two greatest actors of our times, Meryl   Streep and Jack Nicholson, both grew up in New Jersey? Is it accidental that   Thomas Edison, surely America’s greatest inventor, did most of his important   work here? Is it accidental that “Hollywood” (the movie industry) began in   New Jersey? Like any American Studies course, Jerseyana is   interdisciplinary—so we will be looking at music, movies, and the arts in   general as much as history and politics. 2014 was the 350th   anniversary of New Jersey. In a sense, our course will continue that   celebration.

3

T/Th

3:55-5:15

WAL   210

(D/C)

Rockland

301:01

TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES: Islam in/and   America

This   course examines the history and presence of Islam in the United States, and the   construction and evolution of U.S. Muslim identity, community, and culture. In our contemporary moment, “Islam” is perhaps   the most misunderstood term in the national lexicon, and stands at the heart of   numerous cultural and political debates about “who we are” as a nation. Much of   these debates rest on the misguided notion that Islam is a foreign presence, a   threat to American values and democracy. In actuality, Islam’s presence in the   Americas stretches back four centuries, to when over one third of African slaves   forcibly transported here were Muslim. At the start of the 20th century, the religion   forcefully re-emerged amongst Black American communities in urban centers in the   North such as Chicago and Detroit. In the 1970s and 80s, large numbers of Muslim   immigrants from South Asia and the Middle East arrived in the United States. As   a result of this rich and longstanding history, U.S. Muslims comprise the nation’s   most diverse religious community, with all of the histories and backgrounds of   its followers reflected in its practices and cultures in the U.S. In this course,   we will simultaneously examine the diverse historical presence of Muslims in the   United States, alongside representations and stereotypes of Islam and Muslims   in media and popular culture. We will approach our study of Islam and Muslims   through critical frameworks of religion, race, gender, and sexuality, paying particular   attention to the experiences and representations of Black American Muslims and   U.S. Muslim women. Our seminar is discussion-based, and in addition to weekly   readings, I will regularly incorporate film, media, audio, and digital texts into   class conversations and coursework.

3

T/F

10:55-12:15

RAB 110B

(D/C)

Chan-Malik

301:02

Director Spike Lee

This   course will survey the work of Spike Lee through screenings, lectures and   group discussions. Students will expand their understanding of the narrative   film genre as well as that of storytelling. Most importantly, this course   will examine the use of film as a medium and conduit for change, conversation   and understanding. Spike Lee's films, both narrative and non-narrative will   be compared and contrasted for their similarities and differences.

Cross listed with: 01:014:301:02

3

M

6:40-9:30

TIL 251

(LIV)

Brown

303:01

Decade in American Culture: 1970s

This   course surveys 1970s America, with emphasis on major trends in cultural and intellectual   life. We will touch on many of the key political and social developments of the   period, including the Vietnam War, Watergate, the energy crisis, liberation movements,   and battles over desegregation, as we look to understand how culture worked in   this society. How did American artists, intellectuals, and other “culture makers”   react to the political and economic problems of the 1970s? How did ordinary people   of various classes, races, and backgrounds express themselves and interpret the   world around them? And how did the cultural production of the period shape politics   and social discourse? The class features readings in historical scholarship and   cultural studies as well as a variety of primary sources, including social criticism,   memoir, film, literature, and music.

3

M/Th

12:35-1:55

RAB 208

(C/D)

Backes

307:01

The Culture of the Sixties (CANCELED)

Examination   of the culture of the 1960s, with emphasis on the civil rights movement, the war   in Vietnam and student radicalism, Woodstock, women's liberation, and the sexual   revolution, using social history, literature, music, and film.

3

 

 CANCELED

313:01

America as a Business Civilization

This course will examine the social, cultural and political underpinnings   of economic constructs such as money, the market, and consumption. Some of the   issues that will be explored are debt in America, as illustrated by the high amounts   of credit card debt many Americans have and the increasing numbers of Americans   declaring bankruptcy. We will also delve into the political economy of higher   education, identifying the factors that contribute to the continuing rise of tuitions,   why colleges and universities engage in what is referred to as an “arms race,”   and what is meant by the commodification of education. We will also analyze the   culture of Wall Street, and the changing landscape of retirement in America.

Cross listed with:   01:014:301:07

3

M/Th

9:15-10:35

HCK 205

(C/D)

Prisock  

316:01

Twenty-First Century Expressions: Envisioning   Other Worlds

This course will   investigate the particularities of American popular culture since the year   2000. Through texts that frame issues including race, gender, sexuality,   and patriotism, we will engage new media, advertising, and pop music that   frame American global identity in the 21st century.

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: 21C, AHp

3

M/W

2:15-3:35

HSB 204

(C/D)

 

333:01

Cultures of Consumption

This course surveys the cultural and social impact of markets, and changes   to how we consume goods and services, from 1492 to the present. We’ll examine,   among other topics, the historic tensions and conflicts between societies defined   by the production of goods and services   and those organized around consumption; the relationship between consumer   practices and the condition of laborers; the impact that consumption has on the   environment and different ecologies; how consumerism has empowered, exploited,   and governed ideas about race, gender, and sexuality; how consumption has changed   with the development of the advertising industry; and, the politics and economics   of debt. This class will combine serious analysis with more “playful” fieldwork   and artistic interpretation. Activities will include a trip to NYC to examine   various stores as living habitats for consumerism, and the maintenance of a class   website where we will deconstruct the different logics of marketing. Cross-listed with History 512:333:01.

3

M

3:55-6:55

RAB 018

(C/D)

Urban

389:01

Junior Seminar: Law, Courts, Justice

This course will be an interdisciplinary introduction   to the legal system as an arena of conflict over American ideals. We will talk   about crime and punishment, legal advocacy, constitutional rights, the citizen’s   role in the legal process, law and social power, race, gender, and family. We   will do so, primarily, by studying individuals or communities who become caught   up—for good or ill—in some sort of legal process or proceeding—from a criminal   trial to civil rights litigation. Reading assignments and films will help each   student develop a research proposal, bibliography, and eventual term paper on   a topic of his or her choosing—all within the general rubric of law, courts, and   justice in the United States.

Satisfies core Curriculum Goal WCd

Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

T

3:55-6:55

RAB 018

(C/D)

Decker (01)

Urban (02)

495:01

Honors in American Studies

Permission of department required

3

By Appt.

Masur

Follow Us

 FB-f-Logo  blue 29

Contact Us

rab cropped

Ruth Adams Building
131 George Street
RAB 201 & RAB 211
New Brunswick, NJ
08901-1414

tel. 848-932-9174