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Course Offerings Spring 2017

Master Undergraduate Catalog

This is a listing of our course offerings for the current semester. Click the plus sign (+) to display full information about the course. 

Course descriptions appear below the course list.

CourseCrCourse TitleCross Listing
listingcreditstitlecrossSectionsPrint

Course

Title

Cr

Time/Place

Instructor

 

101:01

 

Introduction to American Studies

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. Employing literature, essays, the digital humanities, law, film, history, visual culture, philosophy, and politics, the class will examine the concept of “America” in its global, national, community, and bodily/psychic permutations. Students will engage with primary and secondary sources of all kinds dealing with history, literature, culture, law, race, gender and sexuality. The goal of the course is to expose students to intellectual and creative possibilities in the field of American Studies, as well as providing incoming majors with key concepts and analytical tools to prepare them for more advanced courses. 

Satisfies Core Curriculum Goals: AHo AHp

 

3

 

MW

5:35-6:55

RAB 001

(DC)

 

Urban

 

 

102:01

 

Introduction to Race and Ethnicity in America

How do we approach issues of race, ethnicity, and skin color in the 21st-century United States? We live in arguably the most diverse and multicultural time in this nation’s history; and yet, these terms remain contentious, and even “fighting words” in public and private arenas, largely because systemic inequality and quotidian forms of discrimination continue to shape lived   experience. This course examines social and political forces, both historical and contemporary, that have brought about racial and ethnic “diversity” and “difference” in the U.S. Focusing on the mid-20th century through the contemporary era, and we will engage case studies from the Civil Rights era through the age of Obama and the War on Terror. Through historical accounts, sociological studies, cultural geography, literature, visual culture, and discussion of current events, we will take a comparative approach to race and   ethnicity. We will also pay close to how racial and ethnic difference and conflicts shape neighborhoods, communities, public space, and property ownership.

Eligible for CCRES Minor

 

3

 

TTh

2:15-3:35

RAB 207

(DC)

 

Chan-Malik

 

215:01

 

Springsteen’s American Vision

Examines the musical and cultural meaning and significance of Bruce Springsteen, an American icon whose work spans five decades. We will probe the roots of his rock ‘n’ roll vision, the transformation of his work over time, and the broader themes that he has addressed as he morphed from a young punk on the streets to a rocker facing the darkness of fame to a misunderstood symbol of America gone awry to an activist who in late middle age sought to make America live up to its promises. Explore themes of escape, work, faith, community, and justice.

 

3

 

 

W

2:50-5:50

AB 1180

(CAC)

 

Masur

 

216:01

 

America in the Arts

This is a course that looks at what distinguishes the arts in 
America--at the special ways Americans communicate in music, painting, architecture, sculpture, movies, and literature--as a reflection of American ideas and values. One 
could argue that the arts are a universal language, but America has made unique contributions to the arts that illuminate the nature of our society and culture. For example, one might ask why it is that jazz, rock n' roll and rap have 
all been American creations, and whatdoes this tell us about our people? We will look at the arts as a means of answering the question, "What's American about America?

 

3

 

TTh

12:35-1:55

RAB 206

(DC)

 

Rockland

 

225:01

 

Thought and Society in the American Past

Examination of the cultures and society of the long nineteenth century from the Revolutionary era to the eve of World War I: revivalism, transcendentalism, populism, progressivism, and pragmatism, among others, through the lens of race, gender, class, and ethnicity. 

Eligible for CCRES Minor

 

3

 

MW

2:15-3:35

RAB 018

(DC)

 

 

246:01

 

The Black Experience in America

Interdisciplinary examination of African-Americans within   the context of American political economy, special conditions of oppression, responses to exploitation, and resultant social changes.

Cross-listed with Africana Studies 014:203:01     

Eligible for CCRES Minor

 

3

 

MW

5:00-6:20

LSH A143

(LIV)

 

E Ramsamy

 

264:01

 

American Folk Life

Folklife is an extension of and often alternate term for the subject of folklore. However, folklife tends to recognize that the study of folklore goes beyond the oral genres to include all aspects of everyday life including material culture (craft, vernacular architecture, and so forth).  In the United States, American folklife is the term often used in the title of research-based folklife festivals presenting the full range of familial, ethnic, occupational, religious, and regional traditional cultures including such expressions as architecture, drama, pageantry, music, dance, storytelling, crafts, costume, foodways, holidays, life-cycle rituals, and occupational skills. American folklife also includes the study of belief systems, including folk religion, folk medicine, and popular beliefs. These traditions are generally maintained without benefit of formal instruction or institutional direction.

 

3

 

TTh

2:15-3:35

LOR 115

(D/C)

 

Gillespie

 

267:01

 

American Film Directors

A course focusing on the films of Stanley Kubrick, Orson Welles, John Frankenheimer, David Lynch, Val Lewton, Andy Warhol and others. In-depth analyses of the structure and content of films which include: 2001: A Space Odyssey, Moonrise Kingdom, Cat People, The Magnificent Ambersons, Mulholland Drive, and others. Emphasis on the "mise-en-scene," narrative form, set design, sound, and special effects in the films of these celebrated filmmakers. Warning: some films may   contain nudity, sexual situations, violence, profanity, substance abuse, and disturbing images.     

 

3

 

TTh

5:35-6:55

Th

5:35-8:35

RAB 001

(DC)

 

Nigrin

 

281:01

 

Topics:  Asian American Studies Learning Community

Explore and learn about the diverse array of peoples of Asian descent in the Americas, including West, South, Southeast, and East Asian Americans and   Pacific Islanders. Throughout the semester, we will examine, reflect upon, and discuss representations of Asian Americans in literature, history, politics, film, scholarship, current events, and popular culture.

 

1.5

 

F

1:40-3:00

Asian American Cultural

Center

(LIV)       

 

Hwang

Lee/Lim

282:01

Native American Culture

This course will survey the key themes and concepts of Native American literatures, covering oral narratives, poetry, fiction, critical works, and film. We will analyze works of Native American literature along with their tribal contexts, exploring tribally specific cultural histories and their traditional and modern literary representations. Throughout the semester we will explore a variety of genres, beginning with the most central, which is the oral tradition, moving on to the ways this central generic form influences Native American poetry, short stories, novels, and film. Identity became a major preoccupation of twentieth century Native writers. We will trace Native American identities in literature, from writers such as Zikala-Sa and D'Arcy McNickle to writers of what has been deemed the "Native American Renaissance." We will conclude with the poetry of Luci Tapahonso and Ofelia Zepeda, who integrate tribal languages with English as a testament to Native American "survivance." 

Class begins on Tue 03/21/17 and ends on Thu 04/27/17  

Special Note: Please contact the Registrar's Office at 848-445-2757 to register for mini courses.

1.5

 

Class Begins March 21 

TTH6:10-7:30

MU 211(CAC)

 

Mullis

 

 

283:01

 

Topic:  Arts Adventure

 Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off-Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience differing artistic forms. How do the aesthetic values of one art discipline (for example, painting) influence the creation of works in another artistic field (such as music or theatre)? We will examine how   current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Class begins on Sun 03/26/17 and ends on Sun 04/30/17  

 

1.5

Class begins mid-semester

Sun

8:30-11:45

SC 201

 (CAC)

 

Appels

 

283:02

 

Topics: Arts Adventure

Visits to museums, galleries, and arts centers in New Brunswick, Princeton, and New York City, as well as Off-Broadway theatre, dance, music, and poetry readings to experience differing artistic forms. How do the aesthetic values of one art discipline (for example, painting) influence the creation of works in another artistic field (such as music or theatre)? We will examine how   current events are depicted in the arts, how the arts shape social values, and how the arts are interpreted by different social groupings. We will also consider the human figure in artistic representation, as well as the body as an expressive vehicle.

Class begins on Sun 03/26/17 and ends on Sun 04/30/17  

 

1.5

Class begins mid-semester

Sun

12:00-3:15

SC 105

(CAC)

 

Appels

 

300:01

 

Topics:  History of LGBT through Film  

Birrell and McDonald define “articulation” as a barometer of our culture and who we are as social beings.  The course interrogates the portrayal of sexually diverse communities and identities through films as a critical lens of personal and political power over human beings.  The class will discuss cultural perceptions that force LGBTQ persons to hide their authentic identities.  Mainstream films such as: “Some Like it Hot,” “The Celluloid Closet,” “Boys Don’t Cry”, “Paris is Burning,” “Broke Back Mountain,” “Trans America” and “Dallas Buyer’s Club” will be explored as well as independent films.  Besides “Chasing Amy,” bisexuality is virtually untreated in film criticism due to the  disavowal of twin fascination and anxiety that bisexuality invokes.  This fluid approach to cinema eroticism deconstructs affectional preferences in the context of films that empower all members of our very complex and evolving American identity. TEXT: San Filippo, Maria (2013). The B Word: Bisexuality in Contemporary Film and Television. Indiana University Press. Paperback.

 

3

 

Th

6:10-9:00

MU 212

(CAC)

 

Schuster

303:01

Decade in American Culture: 1980s

This class explores the culture and society of 1980s America. We examine the decade's pervasive concern with surfaces and ultimately seek to reveal the deeper questions, commitments, and changes that marked the period and continue to define the world we live in today. The class takes popular culture as a special focus and looks at the period through mainstream movies, popular literature, and best-selling non-fiction, as well as pop songs, music videos, and popular political movements. We also consider broad intellectual trends of the time as well as the political and economic context in which the culture of the decade unfolded. 

3

MTh

9:50-11:10

SC 103

(CAC)

Backes

304:01

 

American City: Race, Class and the Apocalypse [CANCELLED]
What do intersections of race, class and the apocalyptic imagination reveal about life in American cities? Taking Newark as a case study, we will explore relations between drug economies and finance, urban policing and incarceration, crisis, political movements, and apocalyptic visions, myth and symbolism.
To understand these intricate relations, we will engage with ethnographic accounts and anthropological theories on race, urbanism, and the occult as well as scholarly works from American Studies, Sociology and History. By the end of this course, you will gain a nuanced understanding of life in the contemporary American city and the cultural conditions of this moment in the United States of Anxiety as we watch the unfolding Age of Trump.

3

 

RAB 208

T/Th 5:35-6:55

 

 

 

310:01

 

Approaches to American Studies: Generations

Introduces students to the research methods and intellectual strategies that characterize the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. The goal of the   course is to familiarize students with the central approaches to the field and to effectively practice American Studies together as a group. To this end the class focuses on the broad theme of generation conflict in American culture and the many scholarly approaches that may be used to explore this topic.

 

3

 

T

3:55-6:55

RAB 018

(D/C)

 

Backes

 

310:02

 

Approaches to American Studies: Generations

Introduces students to the research methods and intellectual strategies that characterize the interdisciplinary field of American Studies. The goal of the   course is to familiarize students with the central approaches to the field and to effectively practice American Studies together as a group. To this end the class focuses on the broad theme of generation conflict in American culture and the many scholarly approaches that may be used to explore this topic.

 

3

 

Th

3:55-6:55pm

RAB 018

(D/C)

 

Backes

 

312:01

 

Sports in American Culture

What do sports in America tell us about our people? For example, why is soccer the number one game worldwide except in our country? What does it tell us aboutourselves that we are the only country in the world where universities compete in sports? Why has the Super Bowl become the most observed (in terms of numbers) American "holiday" while it is, of course, not a holiday at all? What about issues of race, gender, and sexual orientation in American sports? The course will court controversy as a means
of illuminating the American character. There will be a good number of guests from the world of sports, especially Rutgers' own coaches.

 

3

 

TTh

3:35-5:15

ARH 100

(D/C)

                 

 

Rockland

314:01

Technology and Culture: On and Off the Internet

In spite of ever increasing expanses in technology, roughly half the global population does not have internet access. This course will examine the cultural implications of this digital divide using a combination of analog and digital sources—music, films, novels, and the internet itself.

3

TTh

12:35-1:55

RAB 207

Moomjy

320:01

The Cold War in American Life

Examines American domestic life during the era of the Cold War (roughly 1945-1991), when U.S. culture was shaped decisively by its geopolitical rivalry with the Soviet Union. Subtopics to be discussed include anti-communism, McCarthyism, the military-industrial complex, conformity and its discontents, civil rights, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and the post-Cold War era. Though we will introduce basic concepts in international relations, this course will focus primarily U.S. society and culture, in order to show how superpower conflict helped to shape not only politics and law but also fiction, film, art, and the public reception of amateur sports. Assignments will range from history and social theory to popular movies and novels.

3

TTh

2:15-3:35

HCK 216

(D/C)

                 

Decker

 

324:01

 

Wayward Americans

Wayward Americans—or—Who’s Normal Anyway?  An examination of individuals and groups, those who might be categorized as “wayward” Americans, allows us to explore various normal/abnormal dichotomies within American culture. How do we determine who or what is normal? Do norms remain constant over time and place? How is normalcy measured? And by whom? How important is context – geographic location, social and cultural background, age, gender, race, ethnicity, and religion – when determining normalcy?  As we examine groups that have been described as different, weird, deviant, strange, abnormal, disobedient or unnatural, we will seek to understand the historical, sociological and psychological underpinnings of the cultural norms, from which these groups are/were excluded.

 

3

 

M

7:15-10:05

RAB 110

(D/C)

 

Zemla

 

325:01

 

Women on the Fringe

Examines societal responses to female behavior deviating from prescribed norms of social and feminine behavior from the colonial period to the present through the use of historical narratives, literature, and film to treat such themes as heresy, madness, prostitution, adultery, criminality, juvenile delinquency, drug and alcohol addiction, political protest, and lesbianism.

If full, register 01:988:325

Eligible for CCRES minor

 

3

 

M/Th

10:55-12:15

RAB 109B

(D/C)

 

Fishbein

 

342:01

 

American Sexualities

A historical survey of American sexualities and sexual cultures from the colonial era through the present, this course will focus on primary source documents and on classic texts that have helped to shape the emerging field of sexuality studies. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which politics, race, religion, ethnicity, age, region, and gender have influenced American sexual cultures and the efforts to regulate them. The course will employ an interdisciplinary approach to its subject, examining artifacts from visual culture such as cartoons, photographs, paintings, and film as well as printed sources.

Eligible for CCRES Minor

3

MW

4:30-5:50

SC 102

(CAC)

Sifuentes

450:01

Seminar: Folk Festival Management  

Focus on the theoretical   study of folk cultures while developing skills in planning, fieldwork, administration, funding, staffing, publicity, and production of the New   Jersey Folk Festival at Rutgers.

3

M

6:00-9:00

RAB 018

(D/C)

Gillespie

 

489:01

 

Senior Seminar: America, Inc: Borders, Culture, Capital

From internal and extraterritorial colonies to outsourcing and building a wall along Mexico, the US has been debating how to imagine and where to place its national borders. Territorial and corporate expansion has historically complicated where US jurisdiction and "America" begin and end. The first half of the semester deals with the making of borders and US racialization, while the second half looks at the corporate global and military presence. The class looks at the different ways the US has incorporated and regulated these spaces of exclusions in novels, films and scholarship. We will then ask how we begin to re-write and re-imagine “America” from these borders? 

Eligible for CCRES Minor

 

3

 

W

3:55-6:55

RAB 018

(D/C)

 

Isaac

 

496:01

 

Honors Senior Thesis

 

3

 

 

Masur

 

 

RU-OFFSITE CAMPUSES  

     

 

300-A1

 

True Crime

(Hybrid course)

 

3

 

Th

3:00-4:20

ACCC

 

McElHinney

 

306-A1

 

American Detective in Fiction and Film

(Hybrid course)

 

3

 

Th

4:20-5:40

ACCC

 

McElhinney

 

317-A1

 

American Justice: “What Race Gots To Do With It?”

 

3

 

T

3:00-5:40

ACCC

 

Furman

 

302-R1

 

Psychology, Film and Pop Culture

(Hybrid course)

 

3

 

T

4:20-5:40

RVCC

 

McElhinney

312-R1

Sports in American Culture

3

W

3:00-5:40

RVCC

Chadwick

 

324-R1

 

Wayward Americans

(Hybrid course)

 

 

3

 

T

6:00-7:20

RVCC

 

McElhinney

 

300-W1

 

Silence in the American Tradition

 

3

 

Th

3:00-5:40

WM

 

Appels

 

301-W1

 

Theatre and History

 

3

 

Th

6:00-8:40

WM

 

Appels

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